Commercial Inspection Services Salem, Alabama

Alabama/ Georgia Home Inspectors

  • COMMERCIAL INSPECTION SERVICES SALEM

The Home Inspection Squad is the leading one-stop solution for commercial property inspections. 

Roof

I. The inspector should inspect from ground level, eaves or rooftop (if a rooftop access door exists):

  1.  the roof covering;
  2.  for the presence of exposed membrane;
  3.  slopes;
  4.  for evidence of significant ponding;
  5.  the gutters;
  6.  the downspouts;
  7. the vents, flashings, skylights, chimney and other roof penetrations;
  8. the general structure of the roof from the readily accessible panels, doors or stairs; and
  9. for the need for repairs.

 

II. The inspector is not required to:

  1.  walk on any pitched roof surface.
  2.  predict service-life expectancy.
  3. inspect underground downspout diverter drainage pipes.
  4. remove snow, ice, debris or other conditions that prohibit the observation of the roof surfaces.
  5. move insulation.
  6. inspect antennae, lightning arresters, de-icing equipment or similar attachments.
  7. walk on any roof areas that appear, in the opinion of the inspector, to be unsafe.
  8. walk on any roof areas if it might, in the opinion of the inspector, cause damage.
  9. perform a water test.
  10. warrant or certify the roof.
  11. walk on any roofs that lack rooftop access doors.

Exterior

I. The inspector should inspect:

  1. the siding, flashing and trim;
  2. all exterior doors, decks, stoops, steps, stairs, porches, railings, eaves, soffits and fasciae;
  3. and report as in need of repair any safety issues regarding intermediate balusters, spindles or rails for steps, stairways, balconies and railings;
  4. a representative number of windows;
  5. the vegetation, surface drainage, and retaining walls when these are likely to adversely affect the structure;
  6. the exterior for accessibility barriers;
  7. the storm water drainage system;
  8. the general topography;
  9. the parking areas;
  10. the sidewalks;
  11. exterior lighting;
  12. the landscaping;
  13. and determine that a 3-foot clear space exists around the circumference of fire hydrants;
  14. and describe the exterior wall covering.

 

II. The inspector is not required to:

  1. inspect or operate screens, storm windows, shutters, awnings, fences, outbuildings or exterior accent lighting.
  2. inspect items, including window and door flashings, that are not visible or readily accessible from the ground.
  3. inspect geological, geotechnical, hydrological or soil conditions.
  4. inspect recreational facilities.
  5. inspect seawalls, breakwalls or docks.
  6. inspect erosion-control or earth-stabilization measures.
  7. inspect for proof of safety-type glass.
  8. determine the integrity of thermal window seals or damaged glass.
  9. inspect underground utilities.
  10. inspect underground items.
  11. inspect wells or springs.
  12. inspect solar systems.
  13. inspect swimming pools or spas.
  14. inspect septic systems or cesspools.
  15. inspect playground equipment.
  16. inspect sprinkler systems.
  17. inspect drainfields or dry wells.
  18. inspect manhole covers.
  19. operate or evaluate remote-control devices, or test door or gate operators.

 

Wood Decks and Balconies

I. The inspector should inspect:

  1. with the unaided eye, for deck and balcony members that are noticeably out of level or out of plumb;
  2. for visible decay;
  3. for paint failure and buckling;
  4. for nail pullout (nail pop);
  5. for fastener rust, iron stain and corrosion;
  6. and verify that flashing was installed on the deck-side of the ledger board;
  7. for vertical members (posts) that have exposed end-grains;
  8. for obvious trip hazards;
  9. for non-graspable handrails;
  10. railings for height less than the 36-inch minimum*;
  11. guardrails and infill for openings that exceed the 4-inch maximum*;
  12. open-tread stairs for openings that exceed the 4⅜-inch maximum*;
  13. the triangular area between guardrails and stairways for openings that exceed the 6-inch maximum*;
  14. built-up and multi-ply beam spans for butt joints;
  15. for notches in the middle-third of solid-sawn wood spans;
  16. for large splits longer than the depths of their solid-sawn wood members;
  17. for building egresses blocked, covered or hindered by deck construction; and
  18. for the possibility of wetting from gutters, downspouts or sprinklers.

 

*See https://www.nachi.org/stairways.htm for formal standards (compliance verification in entirety not required).

 

II. The inspector is not required to:

  1. discover insect infestation or damage.
  2. inspect, determine or test the tightness or adequacy of fasteners.
  3. determine lumber grade.
  4. measure moisture content.
  5. inspect for or determine bending strength.
  6. inspect for or determine shear stress.
  7. determine lag screw or bolt shear values.
  8. calculate loads.
  9. determine proper spans or inspect for deflections.
  10. discover decay hidden by paint.
  11. verify that flashing has been coated to prevent corrosion.
  12. determine that post-to-footing attachments exist.
  13. dig below grade or remove soil around posts.
  14. crawl under any deck with less than 3 feet of headroom or remove deck skirting to acquire access.
  15. determine proper footing depth or frostline.
  16. verify proper footing size.
  17. perform pick tests.
  18. perform or provide any architectural or engineering service.
  19. use a level or plumb bob.
  20. use a moisture meter.
  21. predict service-life expectancy.
  22. verify compliance with permits, codes or formal standards.
  23. inspect for disabled persons' accessibility barriers.
  24. determine if a deck blocks, covers or hinders septic tank or plumbing access.
  25. determine easement-encroachment compliance.

 

Basement, Foundation and Crawlspace

I. The inspector should inspect:

  1. the basement;
  2. the foundation;
  3. the crawlspace;
  4. the visible structural components;
  5. and report on the location of under-floor access openings;
  6. and report any present conditions or clear indications of active water penetration observed by the inspector;
  7. for wood in contact with or near soil;
  8. and report any general indications of foundation movement that are observed by the inspector, such as, but not limited to: sheetrock cracks, brick cracks, out-of-square door frames, or floor slopes;
  9. and report on any cutting, notching or boring of framing members that may present a structural or safety concern.

 

II. The inspector is not required to:

  1. enter any crawlspaces that are not readily accessible, or where entry could cause damage or pose a hazard to the inspector.
  2. move stored items or debris.
  3. operate sump pumps.
  4. identify size, spacing, span or location, or determine the adequacy of foundation bolting, bracing, joists, joist spans or support systems.
  5. perform or provide any engineering or architectural service.
  6. report on the adequacy of any structural system or component.

 

Heating and Ventilation

I. The inspector should inspect:

  1. multiple gas meter installations, such as a building with multiple tenant spaces, and verify that each meter is clearly and permanently identified with the respective space supplied;
  2. the heating systems using normal operating controls, and describe the energy source and heating method;
  3. and report as in need of repair heating systems that do not operate;
  4. and report if the heating systems are deemed inaccessible;
  5. and verify that a permanent means of access, with permanent ladders and/or catwalks, are present for equipment and appliances on roofs higher than 16 feet;
  6. and verify the presence of level service platforms for appliances on roofs with a slope of 25% or greater;
  7. and verify that luminaire and receptacle outlets are provided at or near the appliance;
  8. and verify that the system piping appears to be sloped to permit the system to be drained;
  9. for connectors, tubing and piping that might be installed in a way that exposes them to physical damage;
  10. wood framing with cutting, notching or boring that might cause a structural or safety issue;
  11. pipe penetrations in concrete and masonry building elements to verify that they are sleeved;
  12. exposed gas piping for identification by a yellow label marked "Gas" in black letters occurring at intervals of 5 feet or less;
  13. and determine if any appliances or equipment with ignition sources are located in public, private, repair or parking garages or fuel-dispensing facilities;
  14. and verify that fuel-fired appliances are not located in or obtain combustion air from sleeping rooms, bathrooms, storage closets or surgical rooms;
  15. for the presence of exhaust systems in occupied areas where there is a likelihood of excess heat, odors, fumes, spray, gas, noxious gases or smoke;
  16. and verify that outdoor air-intake openings are located at least 10 feet away from any hazardous or noxious contaminant sources, such as vents, chimneys, plumbing vents, streets, alleys, parking lots or loading docks;
  17. outdoor exhaust outlets for the likelihood that they may cause a public nuisance or fire hazard due to smoke, grease, gases, vapors or odors;
  18. for the potential of flooding or evidence of past flooding that could cause mold in ductwork or plenums; and
  19. condensate drains.

 

II. The inspector is not required to:

  1. inspect or evaluate interiors of flues or chimneys, fire chambers, heat exchangers, humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters, solar heating systems, fuel tanks, safety devices, pressure gauges, or control mechanisms.
  2. determine the uniformity, temperature, flow, balance, distribution, size, capacity, BTU, or supply adequacy of the heating system.
  3. light or ignite pilot flames.
  4. activate heating, heat pump systems, or other heating systems when ambient temperatures or other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or may damage the equipment.
  5. over-ride electronic thermostats.
  6. evaluate fuel quality.
  7. verify thermostat calibration, heat anticipation or automatic setbacks, timers, programs or clocks.
  8. inspect tenant-owned or tenant-maintained heating equipment.
  9. determine ventilation rates.
  10. perform capture and containment tests.
  11. test for mold.

 

Cooling

I. The inspector should inspect:

  1. multiple air-conditioning compressor installations, such as a building with multiple tenant spaces, and verify that each compressor is clearly and permanently identified with the respective space supplied;
  2. the central cooling equipment using normal operating controls;
  3. and verify that luminaire and receptacle outlets are provided at or near the appliance;
  4. and verify that a permanent means of access, with permanent ladders and/or catwalks, are present for equipment and appliances on roofs higher than 16 feet;
  5. and verify the presence of level service platforms for appliances on roofs with a slope of 25% or greater;
  6. wood framing with cutting, notching or boring that might cause a structural or safety issue;
  7. pipe penetrations in concrete and masonry building elements to verify that they are sleeved;
  8. piping support;
  9. for connectors, tubing and piping that might be installed in a way that exposes them to physical damage;
  10. for the potential of flooding or evidence of past flooding that could cause mold in ductwork and plenums; and
  11. condensate drains.

 

II. The inspector is not required to:

  1. inspect or test compressors, condensers, vessels, evaporators, safety devices, pressure gauges, or control mechanisms.
  2. determine the uniformity, temperature, flow, balance, distribution, size, capacity, BTU, or supply adequacy of the cooling system.
  3. inspect window units, through-wall units, or electronic air filters.
  4. operate equipment or systems if exterior temperature is below 60° Fahrenheit, or when other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or may damage the equipment.
  5. inspect or determine thermostat calibration, cooling anticipation, or automatic setbacks or clocks.
  6. examine electrical current, coolant fluids or gases, or coolant leakage.
  7. inspect tenant-owned or tenant-maintained cooling equipment.
  8. test for mold.

 

Plumbing

I. The inspector should inspect:

  1. and verify the presence of and identify the location of the main water shut-off valve to each building;
  2. and verify the presence of a back-flow prevention device if, in the inspector's opinion, a cross-connection could occur between the water-distribution system and non-potable water or private source;
  3. the water-heating equipment, including combustion air, venting, connections, energy-source supply systems, and seismic bracing, and verify the presence or absence of temperature-/pressure-relief valves and/or Watts 210 valves;
  4. and flush a representative number of toilets;
  5. and water-test a representative number of sinks, tubs and showers for functional drainage;
  6. and verify that hinged shower doors open outward from the shower, and have safety glass-conformance stickers or indicators;
  7. the interior water supply, including a representative number of fixtures and faucets;
  8. the drain, waste and vent systems, including a representative number of fixtures;
  9. and describe any visible fuel-storage systems;
  10. and test sump pumps with accessible floats;
  11. and describe the water supply, drain, waste and main fuel shut-off valves, as well as the location of the water main and main fuel shut-off valves;
  12. and determine whether the water supply is public or private;
  13. the water supply by viewing the functional flow in several fixtures operated simultaneously, and report any deficiencies as in need of repair;
  14. and report as in need of repair deficiencies in installation and identification of hot and cold faucets;
  15. and report as in need of repair mechanical drain stops that are missing or do not operate if installed in sinks, lavatories and tubs;
  16. and report as in need of repair commodes that have cracks in the ceramic material, are improperly mounted on the floor, leak, or have tank components that do not operate; and
  17. piping support.

 

II. The inspector is not required to:

  1. determine the adequacy of the size of pipes, supplies, vents, traps or stacks.
  2. ignite pilot flames.
  3. determine the size, temperature, age, life expectancy or adequacy of the water heater.
  4. inspect interiors of flues or chimneys, cleanouts, water-softening or filtering systems, dishwashers, interceptors, separators, sump pumps, well pumps or tanks, safety or shut-off valves, whirlpools, swimming pools, floor drains, lawn sprinkler systems or fire sprinkler systems.
  5. determine the exact flow rate, volume, pressure, temperature or adequacy of the water supply.
  6. verify or test anti-scald devices.
  7. determine the water quality, potability or reliability of the water supply or source.
  8. open sealed plumbing access panels.
  9. inspect clothes washing machines or their connections.
  10. operate any main, branch or fixture valve.
  11. test shower pans, tub and shower surrounds, or enclosures for leakage.
  12. evaluate compliance with local or state conservation or energy standards, or the proper design or sizing of any water, waste or venting components, fixtures or piping.
  13. determine the effectiveness of anti-siphon, back-flow prevention or drain-stop devices.
  14. determine whether there are sufficient cleanouts for effective cleaning of drains.
  15. evaluate gas, liquid propane or oil-storage tanks.
  16. inspect any private sewage waste-disposal system or component within such a system.
  17. inspect water-treatment systems or water filters.
  18. inspect water-storage tanks, pressure pumps, ejector pumps, or bladder tanks.
  19. evaluate wait time for hot water at fixtures, or perform testing of any kind on water-heater elements.
  20. evaluate or determine the adequacy of combustion air.
  21. test, operate, open or close safety controls, manual stop valves, or temperature- or pressure-relief valves.
  22. examine ancillary systems or components, such as, but not limited to, those relating to solar water heating or hot-water circulation.
  23. determine the presence or condition of polybutylene plumbing.

 

Electrical

I. The inspector should inspect:

  1. the service drop/lateral;
  2. the meter socket enclosures;
  3. the service-entrance conductors, and report on any noted deterioration of the conductor insulation or cable sheath;
  4. the means for disconnecting the service main;
  5. the service-entrance equipment, and report on any noted physical damage, overheating or corrosion;
  6. and determine the rating of the service disconnect amperage, if labeled;
  7. panelboards and over-current devices, and report on any noted physical damage, overheating, corrosion, or lack of accessibility or working space (minimum 30 inches wide, 36 inches deep, and 78 inches high in front of panel) that would hamper safe operation, maintenance or inspection;
  8. and report on any unused circuit-breaker panel openings that are not filled;
  9. and report on absent or poor labeling;
  10. the service grounding and bonding;
  11. a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles, including receptacles observed and deemed to be AFCI-protected using the AFCI test button, where possible.  Although a visual inspection, the removal of faceplates or other covers or luminaires (fixtures) to identify suspected hazards is permitted;
  12. and report on any noted missing or damaged faceplates or box covers;
  13. and report on any noted open junction boxes or open wiring splices;
  14. and report on any noted switches and receptacles that are painted;
  15. and test all ground-fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) receptacles and GFCI circuit breakers observed and deemed to be GFCIs using a GFCI tester, where possible;
  16. and report the presence of solid-conductor aluminum branch-circuit wiring, if readily visible;
  17. and report on any tested GFCI receptacles in which power was not present, polarity was incorrect, the cover was not in place, the GFCI devices were not installed properly or did not operate properly, any evidence of arcing or excessive heat, or where the receptacle was not grounded or was not secured to the wall;
  18. and report the absence of smoke detectors;
  19. and report on the presence of flexible cords being improperly used as substitutes for the fixed wiring of a structure or running through walls, ceilings, floors, doorways, windows, or under carpets.

 

II. The inspector is not required to:

  1. insert any tool, probe or device into the main panelboard, sub-panels, distribution panelboards, or electrical fixtures.
  2. operate electrical systems that are shut down.
  3. remove panelboard cabinet covers or dead fronts if they are not readily accessible.
  4. operate over-current protection devices.
  5. operate non-accessible smoke detectors.
  6. measure or determine the amperage or voltage of the main service equipment, if not visibly labeled.
  7. inspect the fire or alarm system and components.
  8. inspect the ancillary wiring or remote-control devices.
  9. activate any electrical systems or branch circuits that are not energized.
  10. operate or reset overload devices.
  11. inspect low-voltage systems, electrical de-icing tapes, swimming pool wiring, or any time-controlled devices.
  12. verify the service ground.
  13. inspect private or emergency electrical supply sources, including, but not limited to:  generators, windmills, photovoltaic solar collectors, or the battery- or electrical-storage facility.
  14. inspect spark or lightning arrestors.
  15. inspect or test de-icing equipment.
  16. conduct voltage-drop calculations.
  17. determine the accuracy of labeling.
  18. inspect tenant-owned equipment.
  19. inspect the condition of or determine the ampacity of extension cords.

 

Fireplaces

I. The inspector should inspect:

  1. fireplaces, and open and close the damper doors, if readily accessible and operable;
  2. hearth extensions and other permanently installed components;
  3. and report as in need of repair deficiencies in the lintel, hearth or material surrounding the fireplace, including clearance from combustible materials.

 

II. The inspector is not required to:

  1. inspect the flue or vent system.
  2. inspect the interior of chimneys or flues, fire doors or screens, seals or gaskets, or mantels.
  3. determine the need for a chimney sweep.
  4. operate gas fireplace inserts.
  5. light pilot flames.
  6. inspect automatic fuel-feed devices.
  7. inspect combustion and/or make-up air devices.
  8. inspect heat-distribution assists, whether gravity-controlled or fan-assisted.
  9. ignite or extinguish fires.
  10. determine draft characteristics.
  11. move fireplace inserts, stoves or firebox contents.
  12. determine the adequacy of drafts, perform a smoke test, or dismantle or remove any fireplace component.
  13. perform an NFPA inspection.
  14. perform a Phase I fireplace and chimney inspection.
  15. determine the appropriateness of any installation.

 

Attic Ventilation and Insulation

I. The inspector should inspect:

  1. the insulation in unfinished spaces;
  2. the ventilation of attic spaces;
  3. mechanical ventilation systems; 
  4. and report on the general absence or lack of insulation.

 

II. The inspector is not required to:

  1. enter the attic or any unfinished spaces that are not readily accessible, or where entry could cause damage or pose a safety hazard to the inspector, in his or her opinion.
  2. move, touch or disturb insulation.
  3. move, touch or disturb vapor retarders.
  4. break or otherwise damage the surface finish or weather seal on or around access panels or covers.
  5. identify the composition or exact R-value of insulation material.
  6. activate thermostatically operated fans.
  7. determine the types of materials used in insulation or wrapping of pipes, ducts, jackets, boilers or wiring.
  8. determine the adequacy of ventilation.

 

Doors, Windows and Interior

I. The inspector should:

  1. open and close a representative number of doors and windows;
  2. inspect the walls, ceilings, steps, stairways and railings;
  3. inspect garage doors and garage door-openers;
  4. inspect interior steps, stairs and railings;
  5. inspect all loading docks;
  6. ride all elevators and escalators;
  7. and report as in need of repair any windows that are obviously fogged or display other evidence of broken seals.

II. The inspector is not required to:

  1. inspect paint, wallpaper, window treatments or finish treatments.
  2. inspect central-vacuum systems.
  3. inspect safety glazing.
  4. inspect security systems or components.
  5. evaluate the fastening of countertops, cabinets, sink tops or fixtures, or firewall compromises.
  6. move furniture, stored items, or any coverings, such as carpets or rugs, in order to inspect the concealed floor structure.
  7. move drop-ceiling tiles.
  8. inspect or move any appliances.
  9. inspect or operate equipment housed in the garage, except as otherwise noted.
  10. verify or certify safe operation of any auto-reverse or related safety function of a garage door.
  11. operate or evaluate any security bar-release and opening mechanisms, whether interior or exterior, including their compliance with local, state or federal standards.
  12. operate any system, appliance or component that requires the use of special keys, codes, combinations or devices.
  13. operate or evaluate self-cleaning oven cycles, tilt guards/latches, gauges or signal lights.
  14. inspect microwave ovens, or test leakage from microwave ovens.
  15. operate or examine any sauna, steam-jenny, kiln, toaster, ice maker, coffee maker, can opener, bread warmer, blender, instant hot-water dispenser, or other ancillary devices.
  16. inspect elevators.
  17. inspect remote controls.
  18. inspect appliances.
  19. inspect items not permanently installed.
  20. examine or operate any above-ground, movable, freestanding, or otherwise non-permanently installed pool/spa, recreational equipment, or self-contained equipment.
  21. come into contact with any pool or spa water in order to determine the system's structure or components.
  22. determine the adequacy of a spa's jet water force or bubble effect.
  23. determine the structural integrity or leakage of a pool or spa.
  24. determine combustibility or flammability.
  25. inspect tenant-owned equipment or personal property.

 

Life Safety

I. The inspector should:

  1.  inspect fire access roads and report on any obstructions or overhead wires lower than 13 feet and 6 inches;
  2. inspect the address or street number to determine whether it is visible from the street, with numbers in contrast to their background;
  3. inspect to determine whether a 3-foot clear space exists around the circumference of fire hydrants;
  4. verify that hinged shower doors open outward from the shower and have safety glass-conformance stickers or indicators;
  5. inspect to determine whether the storage of flammable and combustible materials is orderly, separated from heaters by distance or shielding so that ignition cannot occur, and not stored in exits, boiler rooms, mechanical rooms or electrical equipment rooms;
  6. inspect to determine whether a "No Smoking" sign is posted in areas where flammable or combustible material is stored, dispensed or used;
  7. inspect for the presence of fire alarm systems;
  8. inspect for alarm panel accessibility;
  9. inspect for the presence of portable extinguishers, and determine whether they are located in conspicuous and readily available locations immediately available for use, and not obstructed or obscured from view;
  10. inspect to determine whether a portable fire extinguisher is stored within a 30-foot travel distance of commercial-type cooking equipment that uses cooking oil or animal fat;
  11. inspect to determine whether manual-actuation devices for commercial cooking appliances exist near the means of egress from the cooking area, 42 to 48 inches above the floor and 10 and 20 feet away, and clearly identifying the hazards protected;
  12. inspect to determine whether the maximum travel distance to a fire extinguisher is 75 feet;
  13. inspect for the presence of sprinkler systems, and determine if they were ever painted other than at the factory;
  14. inspect for the presence of emergency lighting systems;
  15. inspect for exit signs at all exits, and inspect for independent power sources, such as batteries;
  16. inspect for the presence of directional signs where an exit location is not obvious;
  17. inspect for the presence of signs over lockable exit doors stating:  "This Door Must Remain Unlocked During Business Hours";
  18. inspect for penetrations in any walls or ceilings that separate the exit corridors or stairwells from the rest of the building;
  19. inspect for fire-separation doors that appear to have been blocked or wedged open, or that do not automatically close and latch;
  20. inspect exit stairwell handrails;
  21. inspect for exit trip hazards;
  22. inspect for the presence of at least two exits to the outside, or one exit that has a maximum travel distance of 75 feet;
  23. inspect exit doorways to determine that they are less than 32 inches in clear width;
  24. inspect to determine whether the exit doors were locked from the inside, chained, bolted, barred, latched or otherwise rendered unusable at the time of the inspection;
  25. inspect to determine whether the exit doors swing open in the direction of egress travel; and
  26. inspect the storage to determine if it is potentially obstructing access to fire hydrants, fire extinguishers, alarm panels or electric panelboards, or if it is obstructing aisles, corridors, stairways or exit doors, or if it is within 18 inches of sprinkler heads, or if it is within 3 feet of heat-generating appliances or electrical panelboards.

 

II. The inspector is not required to:

  1. test alarm systems or determine if alarms systems have been tested.
  2. inspect or test heat detectors, fire-suppression systems, or sprinkler systems.
  3. determine the combustibility or flammability of materials in storage.
  4. determine the adequate number of fire extinguishers needed, or their ratings.
  5. test or inspect fire extinguishers, their pressure, or for the presence of extinguisher inspection tags or tamper seals.
  6. inspect or test fire pumps or fire department connections.
  7. inspect or test cooking equipment suppression systems.
  8. determine the operational time of emergency lighting or exit signs.
  9. inspect for proper occupant load signs.
  10. determine fire ratings of walls, ceilings, doors, etc.
  11. inspect, test or determine the adequacy of fire escapes or ladders.
  12. inspect fire department lock boxes or keys.
  13. determine the flame resistance of curtains or draperies.
  14. inspect parking or outdoor lighting.
  15. inspect for unauthorized entry or crime issues.
  16. inspect or test security systems.
  17. inspect for pet or livestock safety issues.
  18. inspect for unsafe candle use or decoration hazards.
  19. inspect or test emergency generators.
  20. test kitchen equipment, appliances or hoods.
  21. verify that elevator keys exist, or that they work properly.

 

Cooking Area

I. The inspector should:

  1. verify that all smoke- or grease-laden, vapor-producing cooking equipment, such as deep-fat fryers, ranges, griddles, broilers and woks, is equipped with an exhaust system;
  2. inspect for the accessibility for cleaning and inspection of the exhaust system's interior surface;
  3.  inspect for grease buildup;
  4. verify that hoods are made of steel or stainless steel;
  5. verify that visible grease filters are arranged so that all exhaust air passes through them;
  6. verify that visible sections of exhaust ducts are not interconnected with any other ventilation system;
  7. verify that visual sections of exhaust ducts are installed without dips or traps that might collect residue;
  8. verify that exhaust ducts do not appear to pass through firewalls;
  9. try to verify that exhaust ducts lead directly to the exterior of the building;
  10. try to verify that exterior exhaust outlets do not discharge into walkways, or create a nuisance, in the opinion of the inspector;
  11. inspect to determine that a portable fire extinguisher is stored within a 30-foot travel distance of commercial-type cooking equipment that uses cooking oil or animal fat; and
  12. inspect to determine that manual-actuation devices for commercial cooking appliances exist near the means of egress from the cooking area, 42 and 48 inches above the floor and 10 to 20 feet away, and clearly identifying the hazards protected.

 

II. The inspector is not required to:

  1. determine proper clearances.
  2. determine proper hood size or position.
  3. test hoods.
  4. test exhaust fans or dampers, or measure air flow.
  5. test fire extinguishers, fire-extinguishing equipment, or fusible links.
  6. test kitchen equipment, appliances, hoods or their gauges.
  7. inspect or test grease-removal devices, drip trays or grease filters.
  8. inspect or test air pollution-control devices or fume incinerators.
  9. inspect or test kitchen refrigeration.
  10. inspect for fuel-storage issues.
  11. inspect, test or determine anything regarding food safety.
  12. issue an opinion regarding cooking operating procedures.

Quick Inquiry

Quick Inquiry Form

✓ Valid